History and Validity of 433 Spanish and Mexican Land Grants in Texas

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Yolanda Zarate returns for another Sunday Speaker Series presentation April 22, 2018.
Yolanda Zarate returns for another Sunday Speaker Series presentation April 22, 2018.

Texas Border Business

Edinburg, Texas — South Texas and northeastern Mexico were once made into porciones, or portions of land that were divided to Spanish settlers by the king of Spain. Learn more about the history of porciones during the Sunday Speaker Series presentation, “History and Validity of 433 Spanish and Mexican Land Grants in Texas,” featuring Yolanda Zarate on Sunday, April 22, at 2 p.m.

Zarate’s presentation will examine the historical and documented evidence surrounding Spanish and Mexican land grants that endured findings of the Bourland and Miller Commission, a sunken ship with original land titles, the Texas Legislature and the test of time.

Yolanda Zarate, an RN by profession, is a researcher of the history of the Spanish and Mexican Land Grants in Texas and their effects today.

Sunday Speaker Series is included in the fee for regular museum admission. FRIENDS of the Museum are admitted free as a benefit of FRIENDship.

This program is made possible with generous support from the Carmen C. Guerra Endowment. Mrs. Guerra was deeply committed to supporting educational opportunities in the Rio Grande Valley. This named endowment was created at the museum by her family to honor her memory and to continue her commitment to providing opportunities for education to the community.

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About Museum of South Texas History

The Museum of South Texas History is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums. It is located in downtown Edinburg at 200 North Closner Boulevard on the Hidalgo County Courthouse square. Hours of operation are from 1 p.m.–5 p.m. Sunday and 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Tuesday–Saturday. Founded in 1967 as the Hidalgo County Historical Museum in the 1910 Hidalgo County Jail, the museum has grown over the decades through a series of expansions to occupy a full city block. In 2003, following the completion of a 22,500 square foot expansion, the museum was renamed the Museum of South Texas History to better reflect its regional scope. Today, the museum preserves and presents the borderland heritage of South Texas and Northeastern Mexico through its permanent collection and the Margaret H. McAllen Memorial Archives and exhibits spanning prehistory through the 20th century.