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CBP Uncovers Almost 500 Pounds of Mangoes in Vehicle at Juarez-Lincoln Bridge 

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Crates carrying mangos and other prohibited agricultural items intercepted by CBP officers and agriculture specialists at Laredo Port of Entry. USCBP Image
Crates carrying mangos and other prohibited agricultural items intercepted by CBP officers and agriculture specialists at Laredo Port of Entry. USCBP Image
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LAREDO, Texas – U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers discovered almost 500 pounds of mango among other prohibited agriculture products in a single enforcement action at the Juarez-Lincoln bridge.

“This significant amount of prohibited agricultural items seized illustrates the important work of our frontline CBP agriculture specialists in preventing harmful prohibited agriculture products from entering the U.S. and in so doing they prevent the possible entry of plant and animal pests and diseases which could harm the nation’s food supply,” said Port Director, Albert Flores, Laredo Port of Entry.

A collection of various fruits and prohibited agricultural items intercepted by CBP officers and agriculture specialists at Laredo Port of Entry. USCBP Image

The seizure occurred on Tuesday, March 26, 2024, at approximately 10:30 a.m. when CBP officers assigned to the Juarez-Lincoln Bridge referred a Chevrolet Colorado hauling a utility trailer for secondary inspection. The vehicle was driven by a male U.S. citizen traveling from Mexico.   Upon inspection of the vehicle and trailer, officers encountered several prohibited agriculture items within boxes and coolers.   Further examination revealed a total of 220 kgs of mango, 30 coconuts, 9 kgs of cashew fruit, 1.5 kgs of nance fruit, 2.5 kgs of sweet potato and about 5.5 kgs of pork products.   

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CBP agriculture specialists issued a $1,000 civil penalty for the undeclared commercial quantity of mango and the other prohibited agriculture products.

CBP agriculture specialists enforce United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) quarantines to prevent the entry of plant pests and diseases that could damage the agriculture industry in the U.S.   Attempting to bring in prohibited agricultural items could lead to traveler delays and may result in a fine ranging from $300 to $1,000.

CBP agriculture specialists and CBP officers work diligently to fulfill CBP’s agriculture mission by excluding harmful pests and diseases from becoming established in the U.S. Learn more about CBP’s agriculture mission.

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